Breeding

BRIEF INTRODUCTION TO GENETICS

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Hip dysplasia is not common in wild animals because of the continuous processes of natural selection and survival of the fittest. In an environment where society removes or inhibits these means of selection, the host of ills of which HD is but one example is denied full effect and allows the least fit to survive and breed as well, and in some instances makes it easier. The hunter bags the biggest game, we cut the best trees down, and so forth.

Stages of Whelphing a Litter of Puppies


Your dog being pregnant can be a nerve racking time for owners who have not had the experience before. Just like with human babies the first is the most challenging and if you intend on doing this often – don't worry it gets easier with practice...

ORTHOPEDIC PROBLEMS IN HOCKS

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Osteochondrosis is a term applied to a number of similar disorders of the joints where bone (osteo-) and cartilage (chondro-) are involved. If they are inflamed we use the term osteochondritis. It is now a fairly common diagnosis in young limping dogs, the defects being found in one or more of those joints I named above. The hock joint is what corresponds to our ankle and first short bones in the foot, though the dog does not walk on the heel as we do. In the hock, the large bone of the lower thigh (tibia) rests mainly on the tibial tarsal bone, also known as the talus. The common specific expression of osteochondrosis in the hock is OCD (osteochondritis dissecans), which means, as it does in the shoulder and the elbow, a small piece of cartilage or bone has come loose in the joint of a young dog and is causing irritation and inflammation.

INBREEDING AND DIVERSITY - PART 1

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Most breeders keep records (pedigrees) of their animals and their animals’ performance. Information such as litter size, milk production, and slaughter weight are collected when such information is of importance. The more information we have, the more informed and accurate our decisions become. This chapter will show us how to use the information at our disposal to make good decisions.

INBREEDING AND DIVERSITY - PART 2

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PART 2 - Most breeders keep records (pedigrees) of their animals and their animals’ performance. Information such as litter size, milk production, and slaughter weight are collected when such information is of importance. The more information we have, the more informed and accurate our decisions become. This chapter will show us how to use the information at our disposal to make good decisions.

INBREEDING AND DIVERSITY - PART 3

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Part 3 - Most breeders keep records (pedigrees) of their animals and their animals’ performance. Information such as litter size, milk production, and slaughter weight are collected when such information is of importance. The more information we have, the more informed and accurate our decisions become. This chapter will show us how to use the information at our disposal to make good decisions.

Will the True Working Dog Disappear?

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As most of you know, I have been involved with the German Shepherd Dog since 1947 as a trainer, breeder, judge, author, and teacher. My love for the breed is unquestionable and I count it an honor to have fought for its welfare and preservation for all these years. In my zeal for one of God's great gifts to man, namely, the companionship and utility of dogs, I may step on some toes once in a while. But it never from spite or greed or self-aggrandizement that I call a spade a spade, and wish to correct error. Lately I have been railing against the deterioration of character in the show dog and the unwillingness of the working-only faction in the sport to make peace and use "gentle persuasion" in bringing the two communities back together.

The Gap Widens

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In the German Shepherd Dog world, and echoed elsewhere, we have long heard (and voiced) complaints about the schism that exists between the "show" (Hochzuchtlinie or high-breeding) lines and the "sport" or working-competition (Leistungs) lines. I'll speak to the issue of the non-standard (AKC, Alsatian) styles elsewhere, but first I intend to discuss the continued and even widening gap in the international type. Here, I will allude a little more to the history of the breed. You might consider this "Part Two", with an illustrated companion article (though not actually designated "Part One") having been made available under the title, "Will the True Working Dog Disappear?"

Immune System Problems in Canine

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The German Shepherd Dog is a very popular breed. In fact, it is Number One worldwide although in the U.S. it ranks much lower partly because of AKC clubs' non-adherence to the international Standards - usually in the AKC top ten, though. As a result of there being so many GSDs, veterinarians and others typically see more cases of most disorders than they do in other breeds. Popularity has its drawbacks, and undeserved notoriety is one of them.

LEGG CALVÉ PERTHES DISEASE

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  A disorder sometimes easily mistaken for hip dysplasia is Legg Calvé Perthes disease, perhaps more frequently referred to by the dog fancier as Legg Perthes. This is an avascular (pertaining to inadequate blood supply), aseptic (not infected), developmental osteonecrosis (dying of bone tissue) of the femoral head and neck, found almost entirely in toy or other small breeds. It can be described as a localized tissue anemia. On radiographs, it often looks as if the bone is rotting away, and lameness with variable pain is the major or only symptom. It has a history in human medicine, too. In fact, that's where it was first discovered in 1910 by three researchers working independently. Legg (U.S.), Calvé (France) and Perthes (Germany) saw a flattening of the femoral head (coxa plana) in affected youngsters and all first thought that trauma was at the heart of its etiology. They determined that this ischemic osteonecrosis of the femur in children was differentiated from osteomyelitis...

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