Genetics

BRIEF INTRODUCTION TO GENETICS

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Hip dysplasia is not common in wild animals because of the continuous processes of natural selection and survival of the fittest. In an environment where society removes or inhibits these means of selection, the host of ills of which HD is but one example is denied full effect and allows the least fit to survive and breed as well, and in some instances makes it easier. The hunter bags the biggest game, we cut the best trees down, and so forth.

Osteochondrodysplasias Leg Deformities and Dwarfism - in the Canine

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There has been renewed interest in the subject of "abnormal" bone lengths, joints, angles between limbs, and related phenotypic variations from what I have called "the ancestral type". We need to establish some definitions of terms before entering into a discussion of the subject. The "ancestral" phenotype in my arbitrary definition (which, however, is in line with the views of many...

Pituitary Dwarfism in the German Shepherd Dog

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Dwarfism is a condition of abnormally small stature, and usually is characterized by altered body proportions. There are several causes and types. Dachshunds, Basset Hounds, and Corgis are examples of achondroplastic dwarfs; they have more or less normal-sized torsos and heads but shortened limbs, and are accepted as typical of their breed. Alaskan Malamutes, on the other hand, are not considered acceptable if they have their particular blood-cell-related disease. In that breed, both achondroplastic dwarfism and hemolytic anemia are inherited as pleiotropic conditions, caused by the same genetic anomaly; i.e., a single gene giving multiple phenotype effects. Additionally, there are dwarfism abnormalities in other breeds, such as pseudochondroplastic dysplasia in Miniature Poodles. ..

INBREEDING AND DIVERSITY - PART 1

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Most breeders keep records (pedigrees) of their animals and their animals’ performance. Information such as litter size, milk production, and slaughter weight are collected when such information is of importance. The more information we have, the more informed and accurate our decisions become. This chapter will show us how to use the information at our disposal to make good decisions.

INBREEDING AND DIVERSITY - PART 2

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PART 2 - Most breeders keep records (pedigrees) of their animals and their animals’ performance. Information such as litter size, milk production, and slaughter weight are collected when such information is of importance. The more information we have, the more informed and accurate our decisions become. This chapter will show us how to use the information at our disposal to make good decisions.

INBREEDING AND DIVERSITY - PART 3

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Part 3 - Most breeders keep records (pedigrees) of their animals and their animals’ performance. Information such as litter size, milk production, and slaughter weight are collected when such information is of importance. The more information we have, the more informed and accurate our decisions become. This chapter will show us how to use the information at our disposal to make good decisions.

Immune System Problems in Canine

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The German Shepherd Dog is a very popular breed. In fact, it is Number One worldwide although in the U.S. it ranks much lower partly because of AKC clubs' non-adherence to the international Standards - usually in the AKC top ten, though. As a result of there being so many GSDs, veterinarians and others typically see more cases of most disorders than they do in other breeds. Popularity has its drawbacks, and undeserved notoriety is one of them.

LEGG CALVÉ PERTHES DISEASE

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  A disorder sometimes easily mistaken for hip dysplasia is Legg Calvé Perthes disease, perhaps more frequently referred to by the dog fancier as Legg Perthes. This is an avascular (pertaining to inadequate blood supply), aseptic (not infected), developmental osteonecrosis (dying of bone tissue) of the femoral head and neck, found almost entirely in toy or other small breeds. It can be described as a localized tissue anemia. On radiographs, it often looks as if the bone is rotting away, and lameness with variable pain is the major or only symptom. It has a history in human medicine, too. In fact, that's where it was first discovered in 1910 by three researchers working independently. Legg (U.S.), Calvé (France) and Perthes (Germany) saw a flattening of the femoral head (coxa plana) in affected youngsters and all first thought that trauma was at the heart of its etiology. They determined that this ischemic osteonecrosis of the femur in children was differentiated from osteomyelitis...

Hip Dysplasia, the LMX Formula

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Many German Shepherd lovers have seen, known, or loved a dog that suffered great pain, even had to be put down at a young age due to Canine Hip Dysplasia (CHD). Though we love this huge breed, the question begs to be asked-Is it worth the risk to purchase and fall in love with a dog only to watch is struggle to stand up when it should be in the prime of its life?

HD in the German Shepherd Dog — a Statistical Study

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HD in the German Shepherd Dog — a Statistical Study. Jan Demeyere study & presentation of Hüftgelenksdysplasie (HD) in German Shepherd Dogs. Translation by Fred Lanting, approved by Jan Demeyere, and Fred’s own notes were then added:

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